SUMMARY

Artificial Intelligence is the latest technology to move into the “Trough of Disillusionment” of Gartner’s Hype Cycle—the phase where negative press, skepticism, and public paranoia is at its peak. The culprit for all this negativity comes from the fear surrounding the proliferation of personal data, accessed by AI programs, and its vulnerability to misuse.

Four key sources of threat include:

Social Media and Digital Marketing

Facebook’s controversial data oversharing has many social media users questioning how much of their data is being sold or manipulated. One journalist downloaded his data file from Google and found it included almost 3 million Word documents full of intimate personal information.

In the Workplace

More than 40% of worldwide employers use artificial intelligence processes of some kind, including for monitoring employee activities. Few laws govern what data can be collected at work and how it can be used.

Healthcare

About 86% of healthcare provider organizations and technology vendors apply artificial intelligence technology. Personal medical information in the marketplace is believed to be 10 times higher than credit card data, which makes data theft irresistible to cybercriminals.

Human Rights

Often, the collection and creation of databases necessary for AI to work are used — with or without bad intentions — to make assumptions about people. Regardless of intent, many see these practices as an interruption of the fundamental rights to privacy and data protection.

So how do we protect unapproved access and handling of people’s data?

Some responses include:

  • Data Encryption, Masking & Containerization
  • Data Use Verification
  • Universal Regulations / Guidelines – (The EU’s GDPR is an experiment to watch)
  • Use AI to Combat Data Fraud
  • Use Humans as Gatekeepers
  • But First … Educate, Earn Trust, Gain Consent

In this paper, we dig deeper into these topics, their implications, and seek to balance the real societal fears with the overwhelming benefits of AI technology. While threats to data privacy are real, we’ll explain how these fears should not stop us from adopting its innovations.

INTRODUCTION

The use of Artificial Intelligence (AI), machine learning, and Robotic Process Automation has exploded in recent years. In 2017 alone companies spent around $22 billon on AI-related mergers and acquisitions, around 26 times more than in 2015. In fact, many dubbed 2017 as “The Year of AI.”

While it’s commonly associated with self-driving cars, digital assistants, and Netflix recommendations, AI is used ubiquitously throughout almost every industry and increasingly in most everyday tasks. Consultant group McKinsey Global Institute believes that just applying AI to marketing, sales, and supply chains could create over $2.7 trillion in economic value over the next 20 years.

Mostly used to collect, comb through, analyze, and interpret large amounts of data (much more than a human could, and faster), AI has become more valuable as more data has become available. Machine learning relies on vast amounts of data to recognize patterns. With the advent of the internet and cloud technologies, sources of data and its collection have increased. Vulnerabilities for data theft or misuse of information have increased with it.

“AI requires a ton of data, so the privacy implications are bigger,” says Andras Cser, vice president and principal analyst at Forrester Research. “There’s potential for a lot more personally identifiable data being collected.”

The rise in threats means data security has become essential at every step of AI technology implementation. What makes these threats so intimidating is how deep they can impact people’s lives. Crimes are not limited to losing material wealth. With cybercrime, identity thieves fraudulently apply for loans, ruin credit through online shopping sprees, and digital insurance fraud.

“Identity theft historically involved stealing credit card numbers and racking up large bills,” says Dr. Gokul Solai, CEO of AI firm Novation Solutions. “But data theft now goes even deeper.”

“When criminals steal your personal health data, the impact is more so than just monetary,” continues Solai. “Now it’s like stalking — like in movies when hackers can know everything about you and ruin your life. We all know about the conventional threats, but the unknown is what’s so scary.”

What’s even more scary is the pace at which personal data cybercrime is spreading.

“We have seen identity fraud attempts increase year-on-year, now reaching epidemic levels, with identities being stolen at a rate of almost 500 a day,” says Simon Dukes, chief executive of fraud prevention organization Cifas.

In the UK, the Cyber Security Breaches Survey 2017 revealed that almost half of all businesses identified at least one cybersecurity attack in the last year. Among medium-sized (66%) and large organizations (68%), the threat is even more substantial.

It’s easy to see why consumers continue to fear AI with dangers like these. According to a Genpact survey, most people are still uncomfortable with their personal information being used, even if it means a better experience with companies.

  • Almost 75% say they don’t want companies to use AI if means infringing on their privacy
  • Only 6% say they are comfortable with personal data being used to customize their user experience
  • 63% are concerned AI will make choices that impact them without their knowledge
  • 59% think governments should do more to protect consumers’ personal data from AI
  • 55% of those ages 55+ don’t see the personal benefit of AI
  • 71% of consumers fear AI will infringe on their personal privacy in some way

“I can understand why people would be skeptical of AI,” says Solai. “There’s a sense of pessimism that we have to overcome. It all comes from expecting the worst. And with cybercriminals, the worst-case scenario is using your data to manipulate your very behavior.”

Since AI is now so pervasive, worst case scenarios like behavior manipulation can seem around every corner. But what arenas are the most threatening? Here are four that rise to the top, including an optimistic counterpoint by Dr. Solai (to help us overcome the inevitable paranoia).

SOURCES OF THREAT

Social Media and Digital Marketing

In 2014, researchers from political data firm Cambridge Analytica asked users to take a personality survey and download an app. This survey scraped private information from their profiles and those of their friends — including details on users’ identities, friend networks, and “likes.”

Later hired by President Trump’s 2016 election campaign, Cambridge Analytica harvested data from 50 million Facebook users through access given to them by the social media platform. Only the 270,000 from the app download had consented to sharing their information. This personal information was later used to target ads toward the users and their network.

The Cambridge Analytica incident has shed new light on how social media platforms collect and share user data with third parties, especially companies that spend millions of ad dollars targeting their users. Many social media platforms get information from apps and websites that use their services (ads, “share” and “like” buttons, analytics services, account logins). Included participants like Twitter, Pinterest, LinkedIn, Amazon, Google, and Facebook make up some of the most visited, widely-used services on the internet.

According to a recent article from Facebook, apps and websites that use their services send  information “to make their content and ads better.”

“When you visit a site or app that uses our services, we receive information even if you’re logged out or don’t have a Facebook account,” writes David Baser, Facebook Product Management Director. “This is because other apps and sites don’t know who is using Facebook.”

The promise of a better user experience does little to calm fears when you learn just how much personal information changes hands (even if you don’t actively use these services).

When you visit a website, the following information sharing might take place without your knowledge:

 

 

What specific information are these collecting and storing? A journalist from The Guardian downloaded the data profile of one user and found out.

Google

After downloading his data stored by Google, The Guardian writer Dylan Curran found his file included 5.5GB (“roughly 3 million Word documents”) of information on his habits and personal life. Here are some of the things Google stores.

Your location every time you turn on your phone, if you have location tracking turned on.

Search history, included deleted searches, across all your devices.

An advertisement profile based on your demographic information including: location, gender, age, hobbies, job, relationships, and income.

Other things they track:

  • Every app and extension you use.
  • YouTube watching history
  • Every Google Ad I’ve ever viewed or clicked on

Other data: website bookmarks, emails, contacts, Google Drive files, photos, brands you’ve bought, calendar, Hangout sessions, music you listen to, Google Books you’ve purchased, phones you’ve owned, pages you’ve shared, steps you walk in a day.

Facebook

When he downloaded his Facebook data, Curran’s measured 600MB (about 400,000 Word documents). Included in his information:

  • Every Facebook message, file, or audio message you’ve sent or received
  • Login locations, times, devices
  • Guesses as to your interests, based on your likes and conversations
  • Applications you’ve connected to your Facebook account
  • They can access your webcam and microphone
  • Photos, videos, music, search history, browsing history

Positive Perspective (Dr. Gokul Solai)

Just like any other tech innovation, you walk a tight a line between being menacing and beneficial. We need to understand the positives of all this shared data. The media gravitates toward negative, so that’s what people remember.

For example, we have the ability to prevent terrorism or suicide, based on the Facebook posts shared by some of its users and the AI set up to flag these posts. They also can know if you were wearing purple on last December. Does that have a huge impact on your life? Versus being able to prevent a terrorist attack or save a life? We have to keep this balance in mind.

In the Workplace

According to a recent study, more than 40% of worldwide employers use artificial intelligence processes of some kind.7 In many cases, these tools are implemented to increase work productivity and efficiency.

On-the-job surveillance at work is nothing new. Factory workers clock in and out of their shifts;  IT departments can see website activity; agencies and law firms require hour-by hour task disclosure. AI makes constant, pervasive surveillance worthwhile because every bit of data is potentially valuable and no extra burden on human workers.

New developments in AI-powered work surveillance include:

Amazon has invented a wristband that tracks hand movements of warehouse workers. It also uses vibrations to nudge them into being more efficient.

Software firm Workaday processes over 60 factors to predict which employees will leave.

Startup Humanyze makes ID badges that track employees around the office and reveal how well they interact with coworkers.

Slack messaging app helps managers measure task completion speed.

Companies pass out FitBits to monitor physical activity for insurance purposes and encourage active lifestyles.

Every year at steel processor SPS Companies, its 600 employees fill out a 30-minute confidential survey that asks if they feel supported by their managers and valued by the organization. For the most recent survey, they brought in AI to analyze responses instead of combing through surveys by hand.

By assigning emotions and attitudes to the language used in open-ended questions, SPS is able to determine if staff feels optimistic, confused, angry, or overlooked. The results are tabulated and used to provide recommendations for department managers and the enterprise. In one example, SPS streamlined its healthcare plans after survey results showed employees were confused by their many options.

The amount of time saved by AI can revolutionize an organization. At a company that used a similar annual employee survey, six HR staffers spent three months to analyze 3,500 surveys. Managers would take another five months to create action plans based on the data. At SPS, HR has used time saved processing survey results to start new mental and physical health initiatives for employees.

There are many positive outcomes to these AI tech advancements …

  • Data from trackable badges can measure if the office layout helps or hinders collaboration
  • Companies can see when workers are misbehaving or sleeping on the job
  • AI can more effectively screen for red flags in expense reports
  • Checks for safety gear and accidents can be more attentively made by AI
  • Biases can be removed from the hiring process with complex resume-scanning algorithms
  • Algorithms can highlight pay differences between genders and races

Yet, with all these benefits come potential vulnerabilities. The human element is sometimes needed to weigh pros and cons of a complicated, nuanced circumstance. Since most emotions are communicated non-verbally, technology that rely only on text-based data can miss the bigger picture. For example, an algorithm may flag an older employee for lower productivity but miss other positive contributions in more subjective areas like leadership, experience, or mentorship.

And as AI tools are used to make more hiring, firing, and pay decisions, psychological effects on anxious employees could cancel out any process improvements. In the case of SPS, employee surveys were confidential but not anonymous. Response analysis can include demographic data, answers on previous surveys, and other background information.

“I’m fully aware of a handful of people who didn’t want to take the survey because they had a fear of being tracked,” said Corey Kephart, SPS vice president of human resources.

In addition, some employment lawyers fear AI might contain biases that could lead to workplace discrimination. Employment and AI lawyer Garry Mathiason claims that any algorithmic bias is likely to have an outsize impact on minorities and other protected classes of employees. A hiring algorithm might notice a higher rate of sick days for people with disabilities and recommend against employing them.

Few laws govern what data can be collected at work and how it can be used. Many employees unknowingly consent to workplace surveillance when they sign their employment contract. The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, the U.S. body that enforces workplace discrimination laws preventing workplace, hasn’t issued official rules for how AI can be used in human resources. However, in 2016 an agency panel concluded that the technology can potentially create new barriers for opportunities.

Positive Perspective (Dr. Gokul Solai)

When we focus only on the negative, we miss the mark on the purpose of these tools and why they were invented in the first place. When we do repetitive tasks our minds wander. Recent tech advancements help ensure task success by limiting mistakes. AI tools actually give employees back a level of self-accountably.

At some jobs, they measure productivity with a stopwatch and a checklist. Would you rather have a band on your wrist gently nudging you to refocus or a manager breathing over your every pause?

Companies have always wanted people to be at work, doing their jobs efficiently, and safe while they’re there. These tasks were being done by management anyway, so why not do them better, with less effort and error? Companies benefit and, ultimately, so do human workers.

Medicine

According to a 2016 report from CB Insights, about 86% of healthcare provider organizations, life science companies, and technology vendors for healthcare are using artificial intelligence technology. By 2020, these organizations will spend an average of $54 million on artificial intelligence projects.

Since the nature of medical diagnosis is so process-oriented and data-driven — collect symptom data, parse data, look for patterns, diagnosis, treat, measure effectiveness, repeat — artificial intelligence and machine learning is a powerful tool for doctors and drug makers.

With the increasing use of AI, powered by connected devices and systems, there are more potential openings for hackers to gain access to valuable personal information. Personal medical information in the marketplace is believed to be 10 times higher than credit card data, which makes data theft irresistible to cybercriminals.

Healthcare-related data breaches have reportedly affected millions of people, including: identity theft, loss of benefits, asset theft, and personal data leaks. According to a recent survey, 36% of medical professionals said that they had experienced an incident related to cybersecurity in the current year.

Aside from using AI to diagnose disease, recommend treatments, and develop new medications, a major benefit includes the open sharing of medical records throughout the industry. Data management is the most widely used application of artificial intelligence and digital automation. Robots collect, store, reformat, and trace data to provide faster, more consistent access.

“Insights gained from faster analysis of more data also helps patient education,” explains Solai. “We can say ‘This is what happened, and this is how you can help yourself with treatments and preventative measures.’”

Although transparency of medical records and data between institutions would create massive benefits, it is weighed against the security of that data.

“In the wrong hands, access to all this private data could lead negative consequences,” warns Solai. “Not only in identity theft, but if an insurance companies knows about a patient’s preexisting condition and then rejects them for coverage, for instance.”

Recently, an agreement to manage digital medical records between a UK machine learning firm and the Royal Free London NHS Foundation Trust was ruled unlawful by the government. The Information Commissioner’s Office found the Royal Free failed to ask for patient consent before implementing and using AI technology. After the ruling and a damaging patient data leak, many healthcare technologists think the public will become “technophobic.”

Positive Perspective (Dr. Gokul Solai)

One of the amazing technologies to come out in this space is the use of smart watches by nurses. The watch is on them all the time, which means it doesn’t get misplaced. They are not intrusive, simple, and accessible.

Nurses are so overworked they don’t get time to spend with patients or make the best use of that time. Alerts, reminders, and patient data can be sent directly to them, improving communication, efficiency, and patient care.

Medicine is a field where “life-and-death impact” is literal, when it comes to AI and information access. These customizable supervisors help give better patient outcomes. Life saving tech like this wouldn’t be possible without access to health data and the power of AI.11

(Read more in our whitepaper, “The iDoctor Will See You Now: Challenges and Implications Facing Future Healthcare AI”)

Human Rights

Though the previous areas of concern are only a few examples, the fundamental issue with AI’s involvement with personal data is the same:

  • What are people’s rights, with regards to their personal information?
  • How do we protect and enforce these rights?
  • How do we enjoy the benefits of AI, while respecting those rights?

Often, the collection and creation of databases necessary for AI to work are used — with or without bad intentions — to make assumptions about people. Regardless of intent, many see these practices as an interruption of the fundamental rights to privacy and data protection.

“Many people assume that AI improves on human decision-making, associating computers with logic and imagining that algorithms automatically work against human biases or limitations,” explains digital rights advocacy group, Access Now. “In fact, since human beings develop algorithms, they can and do replicate and reinforce our biases, and increasing use of AI may only work to institutionalize discrimination while diminishing human accountability for it.”

Even before AI became as sophisticated as it is today, researchers discovered bias in the algorithms used for university admissions, human resources, credit ratings, banking, the child support system, social security, and more. One example includes London’s St. George’s Hospital Medical in London in the 1980’s. The school used an algorithm to comb through student applications and found it to discriminate against women and non-European-looking names.

What’s more, much of the use of artificial intelligence goes on without our explicit knowledge, in the backgrounds of our everyday interactions with the world.

Positive Perspective (Dr. Gokul Solai)

At some point, we will have to address these questions together. Laws and regulations can be beneficial, but only take us so far. While we used to expect a central, authoritarian power to hand down declarations, our society is breaking away from this mindset with the help of technology. Society will have to determine a united code and do so together.

The Moral Machine project at MIT is a small-scale example of this idea. They set up a social experiment to crowdsource the establishment of universal driverless vehicle ethics. Through a set of scenarios, people give input into how machines should process decisions. While not a perfect solution to the issue of human rights protection, we could learn a lot from this experiment.

DATA

As we have seen with the previous examples (far from every threat that exists), if artificial intelligence technology is to overcome concerns from the public. Here are some steps technologists can take to protect data and trust of the consumer.

Data Encryption, Masking & Containerization

Encryption — converting information from a readable form to an encoded version that can only be decoded by a key — is seen by many as the first step in protecting personal data.

“Security is an endless race, and encryption, in short, protects people,” said Jane Horvath, senior director of global privacy at Apple.

Differential privacy, for example, introduces randomness into aggregated data, reducing the risk of re-identification while preserving conclusions made from the data, explains Dr. Mark Wardle, a consultant neurologist and health informatics expert.

Homomorphic encryption, a more advanced technique, “allows information such as private medical data to be encrypted and subsequently processed without needing decryption,” Wardle explained. “Such technology is, as far as I am aware, at a very early stage as it is extremely computationally-intensive.”

Collected data can be also be masked or anonymized so that readers can’t learn specific information about a specific user. Some companies use this approach with regulatory compliance, where “blind” enforcement policies use threat detection on devices without connecting identifying information. Apple’s iOS 10 for mobile devices added similar privacy techniques. It can recognize app and data usage patterns among user groups while hiding the identities of individuals.

In the workplace, another best practice is containerization. By separating business and personal apps, enterprise mobility management tools analyze data from only corporate apps, while still preventing malware from infecting personal apps. Containerization allows IT departments to protect its organization without invading users’ privacy on personal apps.

“Blockchain is another technology we can use to anonymize data, while keeping a trail for analysis,” says Solai. “We’re still learning how best to use this tech, but it could be beneficial for protecting invaluable personal information.”

Data Use Verification

AI research firm, DeepMind, is working to boost transparency and trust through a data access tracking process called Verifiable Data Audit (VDA).

“[VDA] is designed to allow partners to check on who has accessed data, when, and for what reason,” says Andrew Eland, engineering lead for health at DeepMind. “It increases transparency by ensuring accurate ‘spot checks’ can be made on data access, creating real accountability.”

VDA differs from other audit systems by using cryptography to protect data from being changed without raising red flags.

“Whilst VDA will be useful for auditing access to health data, it could also be used to build trust in systems more generally,” Eland says. “For example, creating unforgeable timestamps to make clear when something was written or created, or ‘watermarking’ data sets to ensure they have not been tampered with — something very important for the machine learning and academic communities.”

The end goal of VDA is to allow patients, patient groups, and regulators to check their data is only being used for approved purposes.
Universal Regulations / Guidelines

A recent study showed that an average of 60% of consumers think their government should be doing more to increase data protection from AI.

It’s a challenge to dynamically regulate this space, but we should universally agree what we need to protect. Individual privacy security should be standardized throughout the world. Data is everywhere, it’s circulating everywhere, so it has to be regulated everywhere.

“We don’t want to prevent innovation, but we also have to recognize that we need to protect information. Especially personal information,” Solai says.

Data privacy regulations differ from country to country. Whereas the European Union has the Data Protection Directive and forthcoming General Data Protection Regulation, the U.S. has no unifying standards. Instead, industry-specific laws govern the nation’s data, individually. The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) protects healthcare information. The Fair Debt Collection Practices Act limits creditors and financial institutions from sharing identifying information about a person’s buying behaviors or debts.

But what should universal regulations include? At the most basic level, certain guidelines should be no-brainers.

  • Consent: no data should be collected without an individual’s knowledge and approval
  • Transparency: a clear pathway to evaluate and understand collection purpose and uses
  • Protection: robust digital security measures
  • Privacy by Design: limit data collection to what is strictly necessary
  • Security by Design: prevent data breaches, harmful interference, and exploitation
  • Accountability: costly fines and sanctions for organizations who do not comply
  • Anonymity: data should be disconnected from people’s identities where possible
  • Bias-Proof: algorithms used for sensitive purposes should be tested for bias and unintended consequences
  • Access: individuals should be able to request and receive their own data

“As we try to develop universal regulations, we need to make it a priority to provide a voice to all people,” adds Solai. “Since universal guidelines protect everyone, there’s a social responsibility to not lean only on a centralized body to dictate laws. Social decisions with this much weight should align with as many people as possible.”

EU’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR)

Some see the European Union’s GDPR as a good framework, or test case, to expanded global data governance. Starting on May 28, 2018, the new regulation’s goal is to give people more control over, and assure greater security for, their personal data.

Complex algorithms used in AI can draw conclusions about individuals with sometimes unwelcome (even unintended) effects — including biasing, profiling, and discrimination — as we have seen in the “Sources of Threat” section. The GDPR aims to prevent these negative actions through increased transparency and accountability.

Highlights of the regulation include:

  • A “right to explanation,” so users are informed about the logic of decision-making algorithms
  • The requirement for these logic explanations to be simple enough for people to understand
  • The right for users not to be illegally profiled by automated processing
  • Consent to AI processing must be given freely, specific, “unambiguous,” and a “clear affirmative action” like selecting a checkbox on a website

While there are many challenges for EU businesses to comply to GDPR — the ability to explain complex algorithms in human terms, for one — many believe it to be a first step toward an eventual resolution to data privacy concerns. Businesses who do not comply face heavy fines and consequences, which itself gives assurance to the public of the priority given to protecting personal information.

Use AI to Combat Data Fraud

“AI’s higher processing power makes it the ideal digital gatekeeper,” says Solai. It’s common sense, if you think about it. But who better to monitor tons of data for abnormal use patterns and risky behavior than artificial intelligence itself? IT researchers already use algorithms to learn and predict new malware. Al-based, self-learning security systems hold the promise of automatic cyber defense in the future.

“Privacy-preserving machine learning offers an interesting technological approach to addressing questions about data access and governance,” says Peter Donnelly, Chair of the Royal Society Machine Learning Working Group.

One method has tying people’s unique behavioral characteristics to their traditional demographic and biometric information. Any change in behavior can signal a possible fraud threat for further investigation. The challenge to make this technique a reality has always been scrutinizing the masses of data from each person and point. Fortunately, that’s the biggest strength of machine learning, RPA, and AI.

One new example? Software firm Onfido has developed a Facial Check with Video authentication that asks users film themselves performing randomized movements. Using machine-learning, the video is evaluated against a user’s identity profile.

“Artificial intelligence and machine learning are crucial security capabilities to interpret the complexity and scale of data available in today’s digitally connected world,” explained Johan Gerber, EVP of security and decision products at Mastercard. The credit card company uses AI to authenticate payments.

Not only can AI be used to combat fraud in the moment, but its pattern recognition capability makes it ideal for prevention. When cybercriminals act, they leave behind evidence.

“When collected and studied by machines, these can provide tremendous insight into the tools, resources and motivations that these modern criminals have,” said Greg Day, vice president and chief security officer at Palo Alto Networks. “Access to rich threat intelligence data and the ability to ‘learn’ from that data will ultimately empower organizations to stay one step ahead of cybercrime.”

Use Humans as Gatekeepers

How much influence we should give machines could be based on how much decisions effect people’s lives. For sensitive decisions that require complex, nuanced reasoning, empathy, and wise judgement, humans are still a better choice. “Shopping recommendations generated by algorithms? No big deal,” says Eduardo Ustaran, codirector of the global

Privacy and Cybersecurity practice of Hogan Lovells. “Being eligible for a certain school, a career-defining promotion, or life-saving medical treatment? Get a human involved pronto.”

As Microsoft’s Dr. Hsiao-Wuen Hon claims, computers are “the best-ever left brain” (logic and rationality) and humans have “the best-ever right brain” (creativity, judgment, wisdom). Using robots to process data and humans as an approver or final check takes advantage of both strengths.

“We have to use a subjective source of reasoning for some decisions,” says Solai. “Historically, robotics has been bound by Asimov’s three rules; however, these rules could never replace human thought or relating to people.” “AI can be the gatekeeper for certain things, but human validation is still important.”

CONCLUSION

But First … Educate, Earn Trust, Gain Consent “[Personal] data is terrifically valuable, powerful, and offers tremendous scope to do good,” says neurologist and health informatics expert Dr. Mark Wardle. “But we also have a great responsibility to protect that data and ensure access is safe, secure, and transparent,”

The biggest barrier to a future partnership between humans and AI may not be lack of laws, need for protections, or data masking requirements. Without societal trust and consent to use AI tools, these steps would be pointless.

Data protection awareness and consumer education will become key to for AI firms to earn confidence in their solutions. Organizations will need specific internal governance guidelines for AI, not only for technical and data input processes, but also addressing legal and ethical issues. An added bonus to enforced internal regulations is the feeling of security it gives consumers.

“If a [consumer] can understand what’s being proposed, can see the benefits, and can make the balance for themselves of the risk to their privacy versus the benefit to their [life], I think you’ll find they’ll be more compelled to participate in [beneficial AI tech],” said Nathan Lea, senior research associate at UCL’s Institute of Health Informatics and the Farr Institute of Health Informatics Research.

Creating societal trust starts with the organizations using automation, adds Solai. He recommends companies follow these techniques to build a culture of trust.

Manage expectations: “Not everyone will immediately embrace disruptive tech like AI. And that’s OK.”

Be open to people’s right to choose: “Don’t hide opt-out information or privacy policies.”

Start with optimism: “The AI implementation process will have challenges, which might include its adoption. But overcoming them will make solutions better.”

Embrace human resilience to innovation: “Look back at where we’ve come from. In the stone age, we were probably afraid of fire. If we let that stop us, we wouldn’t have the combustion engine. And the modern economic growth in manufacturing came from automated robots that people were scared would replace them.”

Avoid over-reliance on AI: “Partnering RPA with strong leadership, data integration and analytics, and business process management is the true path to digital business innovation.” (See “The iDoctor Will See You Now,” Novatio Whitepaper)

Choose the Right AI Partner:

When selecting the right digital workforce products, you need a flexible, knowledgeable leader — especially one well-versed in both understanding the concerns of data privacy protection and benefits of artificial intelligence technology. Trust a partner who can give experience-based guidance on how to accommodate for digital workforce implementation and transformational leadership.

For 25 years, Novatio Solutions has provided this leadership in managed business process (BPO) outsourcing for Fortune 100 clients. They have returned more than 500,000 hours back to their partners, so that those organizations’ employees can focus on higher-value work. They have helped free managers from micromanaging. And they have helped empower people to harness the cognitive skills that make them human.

“The Novatio team understands automation and what it takes to transform business operations,” says Dr. Gokul Solai, head of products and alliances for Novatio. “Our goal is to use digital workforce solutions to make everyone’s life easier, from the CEO to the person answering the phones.”

It’s this top-to-bottom understanding of human workers and end users—their natures, fears, desires, and needs—that allows that allows for successful system transitions and solution adoptions. Novatio Solutions provides a versatility of implementations for a wide variety of companies in fields such as tech, finance, government, transportation, insurance, healthcare, retail, and manufacturing.

Novatio Digital Workforce

  • Noninvasive, technology-agnostic workforce
  • 100% compliance
  • Zero errors
  • 3-5 times greater productivity
  • 1/10 price of traditional workforces
  • 2-3 times faster implementation than other solutions

Humanistic Mindset

When evaluating AI technology solutions, the “what” and “why” — helping people live better, longer, more healthy lives —should be prioritized over the how. “The most efficient solution might be what you want from technology,” says Solai, “But is it the safest most helpful solution?”

Their focus on the people impacted by the technology, instead of the technology separates Novatio from other firms.

SOURCES
1 “AI-Spy: The Workplace of The Future,” The Economist, https://www.economist.com/news/leaders/21739658- artificial-intelligence-pushes-beyond-tech-industry-work-could-become-faireror-more, March 28, 2018

2 “Artificial Intelligence Data Privacy Issues on The Rise,” https://searchmobilecomputing.techtarget.com/news/450419686/Artificial-intelligence-data-privacy-issues-onthe-rise

3 “The Role of AI and Machine Learning in Personal Data Security,” Raconteur, https://www.raconteur.net/technology/the-role-of-ai-and-machine-learning-in-personal-data security

4 “Report: 71% Of Consumers Fear AI Will Infringe on Their Privacy,” TechRepublic, https://www.techrepublic.com/article/report-71-of-consumers-fear-ai-will-infringe-on-their-privacy/

5 “Hard Questions: What Data Does Facebook Collect When I’m Not Using Facebook, and Why?” Facebook Newsroom, https://newsroom.fb.com/news/2018/04/data-off facebook, David Baser, Product Management Director

6 “Are You Ready? This Is All The Data Facebook And Google Have On You,” The Guardian, https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2018/mar/28/all-the-data-facebook-google-has-on-you-privacy, Dylan Curran

7 “What’s on Your Mind? Bosses Are Using Artificial Intelligence to Find Out ,” The Wall Street Journal, https://www.wsj.com/articles/whats-on-your-mind-bosses-are-using-artificial-intelligence-to-find-out1522251302, Imani Moise, March 28, 2018

8 “The iDoctor Will See You Now: Challenges and Implications Facing Future Healthcare AI,” Novatio Solutions, http://novatiosolutions.com/wp content/uploads/2017/09/novatio_white_paper_v5.pdf, August 2017

9 “How important is Data Security in the Age of Artificial Intelligence?” Entrepreneur, https://www.entrepreneur.com/article/306623, Ashim Roy

10 “AI Has No Place in The NHS If Patient Privacy Isn’t Assured,” WIRED UK, http://www.wired.co.uk/article/aihealthcare-gp-deepmind-privacy-problems, Nicole Kobie

11 Mobile Village, “RistCall Patient Care App Puts Patient Alerts on Smart Watches,” http://www.mobilevillage.com/harbinger-ristcall-patient-care-app/

12 “Artificial Intelligence: what are the issues for digital rights?” Access Now, https://www.accessnow.org/artificial-intelligence-issues-digital-rights/

13 “The Problem With Algorithms: Magnifying Misbehavior,” The Guardian, https://www.theguardian.com/news/datablog/2013/aug/14/problem-with-algorithms-magnifying-misbehaviour

14 “Driverless Cars and MIT’s Test of the Crowdsourcing Morality,” Financial Times, https://www.ft.com/content/8fc7fde0-7f21-11e6-8e50-8ec15fb462f4, Anjana Ahuja, Sept. 20, 2016

15 “Artificial Intelligence Poses Data Privacy Challenges,” Bloomberg Law, https://www.bna.com/artificialintelligence-poses-n57982079158/, Stephen Gardner

16 “The Consumer: Sees AI Benefits But Still Prefers The Human Touch,” Genpact, http://www.genpact.com/downloadable-content/the-consumer-sees-ai-benefits-but-still-prefers-the-humantouch.pdf)

17 “Is Artificial Intelligence the Ultimate Test for Privacy?” HL Chronicle of Data Protection, https://www.hldataprotection.com/2018/03/articles/consumer-privacy/is-artificial-intelligence-the-ultimate-testfor-privacy/

18 “Artificial intelligence (AI) + Human intelligence (HI) = (collective) intelligence (amplified) or super intelligence,” LinkedIn, https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/artificial-intelligence-ai-human-hi-collective-supernekaj-%E5%AE%87-%E8%B5%AB, Epi Ludvik Nekaj, Feb. 23, 2017

ABOUT NOVATIO SOLUTIONS

Novatio Solutions is a Digital Workforce provider from the founders of Solai & Cameron Technologies. The company capitalizes on Solai & Cameron’s 25 years of experience developing best practices in operational transformation.

Novatio harmonizes multiple robotic process automation (RPA) tools along with next generation technology to create a customized digital workforce. Consequently, Novatio’s clients benefit from added capacity, scalability, and efficiency.

“Traditional” automation solutions usually fall short in their rigidity. They are limited in scope and benefits and too expensive to update or change. There’s a long change process that is highly disruptive to teams and systems. And, they require more internal technical resources. In many cases, companies rely on legacy applications or systems that are no longer supported. When changes or integrations are needed, technical support resources are difficult to find. Novatio Solutions harmonizes multiple and previously disconnected robotic process automation (RPA) tools and combines them with next-generation technology to create a customized digital workforce. Robotic process automation with digital workers gives agility and flexibility to accommodate change; decreases time to value; and is less expensive to set up and maintain.

The Novatio online portal offers advanced business intelligence tools, an online marketplace and service catalog and visibility into usage and billing. Simulator tools provide real time input on cost-savings, which prioritizes time and cost efficiency. The portal also provides insight into forecasting and demand prediction, which allow for to data-driven staffing and a more proactive decision-making.

For more information, visit NovatioSolutions.com.

Copyright © 2018 Novotio Solutions. All Rights Reserved. For more information, please contact

Irene Regaspi at info@novatiosolutions.com or 855-765-2264.

Artificial Intelligence (AI) technologies like Robotic Process Automation (RPA) and machine learning are the biggest disruptors in global business since the Internet. They are transforming work by stripping away mundane, repetitive tasks and freeing up people to handle more advanced, innovative work.

In fact, many dubbed 2017 “The Year of AI,” based on its widespread impact. As we approach the end of 2017, we can reflect on the technological milestones and discoveries and use them to look forward.

Read on as we explore some of the biggest RPA and AI trends in 2017 and which new ones will influence the future

2017 YEAR in REVIEW

2017 YEAR IN REVIEW: THREE BIG TRENDS

Industries Using RPA to Unlock Innovation

Many industries are seeing more innovative developments from their unchained human staff thanks to digital automation. Some of the well-documented sectors include healthcare – where about 86% of providers and companies use some form of AI — and information technology, which always has the pulse of latest tech trends.

However, other sectors are unlocking innovation in surprising ways by leveraging the strengths of both their workforces. Government and Law Enforcement, Banking and Accounting, Retail and Customer Service, Telecommunications, and Mass Transportation have all seen innovation breakthroughs by leaning on digital workforces for everyday tasks.

In banking, for example, automation is being used by banks to flag suspicious spending behavior, communicate with customers, validate credit screening data, and review wire transfers for fraud, just to name a few. Also in 2017, H&R Block used tax-code-trained AI to alert its accountants about deduction or claim opportunities on customers’ tax returns.

Businesses Use RPA to Increase Staff Size / Effectiveness

Many companies wish they could “clone” their most productive employees, doubling their staff’s capacity without adding extra costs. With RPA, businesses are finding they can do just that.

At one of Novatio’s clients, for example, employees at an overseas shipping company spend valuable time manually updating shipment-tracking information in various databases. Updating these databases is nonstop, tedious, and ripe for human errors. Multiple systems hold different types of data, which means staff constantly log in and out of databases to edit information.

Novatio launched a solution that uses digital workers and RPA to compare data and update all systems automatically, with no data loss. Digital workers autonomously track reports, update the different databases, validate the data, and report back to human workers, all with zero errors.

The company’s human workers can spend more time following up on shipment issues, working directly with customers and delivery staff. And the resulting tracking accuracy gives better insight to customers, with the efficiencies gained boosting the value of their services.

Silicon Valley Giants to Small Businesses

According to CIO Magazine, “[In 2017], machine learning took the place of big data as the shiny new thing in technology.” Apple, Microsoft, Facebook, and Google were key companies that launched AI initiatives. Apple’s AI team ended their secrecy and started the Apple Machine Learning Journal — an online research publisher. Microsoft has followed suit, and Facebook released educational content explaining how AI works. Meanwhile, Google continues to spend big on AI and RPA research.

As Silicon Valley’s giants increase spending, research, and product creation, the “little guys” have benefitted. Starting in 2017, and surely into the future, RPA technology has never been more affordable and accessible for all business uses — from the solo-preneur to the Fortune 500.

RPA

2018 AND BEYOND: RPA OF THE FUTURE

That was 2017. What about 2018 (and beyond)? We asked Novatio Solutions CEO and co-founder, Gokul Solai, M.D., to predict the future of RPA. Here are the biggest trends he sees coming.

STANDARDIZED NOMENCLATURE

One of the biggest pushes for the future will be around the terms used for the technology. The industry has been so hot that tools in this space were mis-marketed as “process automation” or “artificial intelligence” when it wasn’t really the case.

“What you see is what you get’ isn’t necessarily true,” says Solai. “And consumers have gotten wise.”

“I think there is going to be a good push to standardize what tools, software, and other solutions are called,” says Solai. “Tech companies will need to be more transparent and operate with integrity, because people are increasingly demanding it.”

One push we might see is the shift from Robotic Process Automation to the more broad Intelligent Process Automation

AUTOMATED AUTOMATION

When it comes to designing and building automated solutions, humans are the driving intelligence behind structuring the rules, requirements, and structure of processes. But recent advancements in technology will allow for even the development of automated solutions to be automated. The concept of “robots building robots” is not a new one, but now possibility has become reality.

“There’s going to be a larger infusion of this technology and how we view tasks we traditionally thought robots couldn’t handle,” says Solai. “Better integrated voice response, better speech to text, and a better ability to understand people and processes means an improved ability to convert unstructured data to structured data by robots.”

Digital workers and cognitive technology will take over more tasks. A mass re-shoring of work (bringing work that had been offshored to low-cost workforces back in-house), as organizations understand they can provide value at cheaper cost. And tech firms will be able to help more organizations, more quickly and more cost-effectively.

Over time, digital automation designers will learn and adapt from previous builds and create optimized solutions at lower costs

RPA 2017

FASTER KNOWLEDGE NETWORK

Computers and digital workers will have larger base of data to draw from — a shared network of data to accelerate knowledge collection.

“Processes and people will be able to store data in more efficient and accessible ways,” says Solai. “And accessibility to that data will be more prevalent for use in developing new technologies.”

INTELLIGENT THINGS

As AI seeps ubiquitously into every technology, the Internet of Things (IoT) phenomenon — the network of connected devices, appliances, content, and hardware — will grow. Artificial intelligence and machine learning will enable these IoT devices to operate autonomously or semi-autonomously.

Technology will allow intelligent things to work collaboratively in what research firm Gartner calls the Digital Mesh. This network will blend “the virtual and real worlds to create an immersive digitally enhanced and connected environment.”

HIEGHTENED AWARENESS OF SECURITY

“A large push toward prioritizing cyber security solutions will be one of the most important developments,” explains Solai. “Companies will need to secure all their new digital solutions, so that robots are not a weak link to hack their organizations.”

NEW INDUSTRIES IMPACTED

Growth areas for RPA include industries that involve heavy physical labor — deep-sea exploration, oil drilling, mining and manufacturing, energy. These industries use digital tools now, but new augmented reality solutions can allow for “personal assistants” that guide decision-making.

“Think Iron Man’s digital assistant, JARVIS,” explains Solai. “These solutions can make it safer, provide more reliable, real-time information, and allow humans to react faster to dangerous events.”

AI-ASSISTED EDUCATION

Leading education companies will lean on AI to improve teaching and learning in the classroom.

AI Assisted Education

From grading to tutoring to testing, many of the tedious tasks in education can be performed by RPA, leaving creative teaching to human teachers.

HEALTH CARE TRANSFORMED

In the health care sector, about 86% of providers and companies currently use some form of AI. But, according to Solai, there are still opportunities to find efficiencies in most processes by leveraging digital workers.

Some efficiencies include:

Health Care - RPA

“Access to medical records is a game-changer,” says Solai. “Right now, if you’re from Arkansas and need health care in Illinois or overseas, those providers can’t easily access your medical history.”

“Those providers must fax records requests to your primary doctor and wait for a fax to come back,” Solai explains. “Block chain can give instant, distributed, and secure access to anyone will the correct permissions. This technology could save thousands of lives.”

RPA IN 2020: INTELLIGENT ECOSYSTEM

By 2020, Solai predicts RPA will be one part of a larger intelligence ecosystem, a network of connected data and automated processes. This network will work together, sharing information, connecting human-used devices, accomplishing tasks autonomously, and learning from each other to find efficiencies.

“In 2020, about 80% of all organizations will use some form of artificial intelligence,” adds Solai. “And the vast majority of all your interactions with companies will be automated, not with a human agent.” Solai also expects AI Designer to overtake Programmer/Developer as the most desirable technology job.

CONCLUSION

While 2017 (“The Year of AI”) saw many new developments in the world of robotic process automation, the years that follow might impact more industries and organizations. From new technologies to optimized processes, RPA techniques will only improve.

Businesses and consumers across the world – massive conglomerates, solo-preneurs, and their customers – will benefit. Only time will tell how innovative and pervasive automation will grow.

AI and Data Privacy Protection in the Workplace

Common Work Surveillance

Monitoring employees at work is nothing new. We already do it without thinking twice.

  • Factory workers clock in and out of their shifts
  • IT departments monitor website activity
  • Agencies and law firms track work by hour
  • Customer service groups record and review phone calls

Productivity Work Efficiency

New Developments in AI Surveillance

Technologies are being developed to better track worker activity

  • Amazon has invented a wristband that tracks hand movements of warehouse workers. It also uses vibrations to nudge them into being more efficient.
  • Software firm Workaday processes over 60 factors to predict which employees will leave.
  • Startup Humanyze makes ID badges that track employees around the office and reveal how well they interact with coworkers.
  • Slack messaging app helps managers measure task completion speed.
  • Companies pass out FitBits to monitor physical activity for insurance purposes and encourage active lifestyles.

Time Savings from AI

Every year at steel processor SPS Companies, its 600 employees fill out a 30-minute confidential survey that asks if they feel supported by their managers and valued by the organization. They use AI to analyze responses instead of combing through surveys by hand.

A similar company surveyed employees and used…

  • 6 HR staffers to analyze surveys
  • 3 months to compile data
  • 3,500 surveys reviewed
  • 5 months for managers to create action plans
  • 9 months from start to finish

Other Benefits of AI Monitoring

Technologies are being developed to better track worker activity.

  • Data from trackable badges can measure if the office layout helps or hinders collaboration.
  • Companies can see when workers are misbehaving or sleeping on the job.
  • AI can more effectively screen for red flags in expense reports.
  • Checks for safety gear and accidents can be more attentively made by AI.
  • Biases can be removed from the hiring process with complex resume-scanning algorithms.
  • Algorithms can highlight pay differences between genders and races.

The following information is from the Novatio Solutions Whitepaper “AI and Data Privacy Protection: Recognizing Fears, Appreciating Benefits.” Download the full report at novatiosolutions.com to gain insights on the role of artificial intelligence in data privacy.

Source
“What’s on Your Mind? Bosses Are Using Artificial Intelligence to Find Out,” The Wall Street Journal, https://www.wsj.com/articles/whats-on-your-mind-bosses-are-using-artificial-intelligence-to-find-out-1522251302,

Imani Moise, March 28, 2018

SUMMARY

  • Current machine-assisted solutions in healthcare include:
  • Medical Records and Other Data
  • Taking Over Repetitive Jobs
  • Treatment Design
  • Digital Consultation
  • Virtual Nurses
  • Medication Management
  • Drug Creation
  • Precision Medicine
  • Health Monitoring
  • Healthcare System Analysis

About 86% of healthcare providers, companies, and technology vendors use some form of artifcial intelligence. As high as that number is, it will only grow as technology continues to evolve.

The reason for shifting towards artificial intelligence are clear benefits, in the form of cost savings, to patients and providers. This will allow speed, accuracy, productivity increases, ability to eliminate mundane work, deeper data analysis and broader healthcare access.

However, challenges lie ahead for wholesale adoption of AI technology. Risk aversion is embedded deep within the industry, and many believe systems and processes that use digital workers to be risky. Many specific questions will need to be addressed and key obstacles overcome to realize a future where humans work side-by-side with robot counterparts.

Needs include:

  • Investment in data support
  • Universal regulation of private information
  • Convincing the industry to embrace change
  • Avoid technology over-reliance
  • Realize the human touch is still needed
  • Build AI as part of a larger strategy
  • Trust the right providers and partners

If these, and more, challenges are faced, the potential for a new, optimized healthcare industry could be realized. One that balances and leverages the strengths of both human providers and machines.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

INTRODUCTION: EMERGING AI IN HEALTHCARE
HOW AI IS CHANGING HEALTHCARE
– 10 COMMON SOLUTIONS (NOW & INTO THE FUTURE)
– BENEFITS OF AI AND AUTOMATION IN HEALTHCARE
CHALLENGES FACING AI IN HEALTHCARE
CHOOSING THE RIGHT PARTNER
CONCLUSION
SOURCES & ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

INTRODUCTION: EMERGING AI IN HEALTHCARE

Many industries have been disrupted by the influx of new technologies in the Information Age. Healthcare is no different. Particularly in the case of automation, machine learning, artificial intelligence (AI), doctors, hospitals, insurance companies, and industries with ties to healthcare have all been impacted – in many cases in more positive, substantial ways than other industries.

According to a 2016 report from CB Insights, about 86% of healthcare provider organizations, life science companies, and technology vendors for healthcare are using artificial intelligence technology. By 2020, these organizations will spend an average of $54 million on artificial intelligence projects.

Investment and contracts from AI startup companies are another way to gauge this growth. Completed deals from healthcare startups are beating out companies in every other industry. (See Figure 1)

“AI Heatmap: Healthcare Emerges As Hottest Area For Deals To Articial Intelligence Startups,” CB Insights, June 18,2016, https://www.cbinsights.com/blog/articial-intelligence-investment-heatmap/

“Deals to healthcare-related AI companies have been increasing year-over-year since 2011, with deals more than doubling in 2014,” the report says. “Funding jumped by nearly 460% in 2014, to $358M, from $64M in 2013.”2

Currently, much of the AI investment in healthcare goes toward improving business processes. But recent advances in technology are widening the scope of digital automation to more client-centric (and ultimately impactful) tasks.

“AI systems are poised to transform how we think about disease diagnosis and treatment,” said Health Industry Analyst Harpreet Singh Buttar. “Augmenting the expertise of trained clinicians, AI systems will provide an added layer of decision support capable of helping mitigate oversights or errors in care administration.”

The capacity of robots to pull information from various and different sources, translate data, and process language allow them to take on challenges that previously had no easy solution. Additional advances will allow AI systems to be used in both clinical decision-making support and fine-tuning of business and logistical workflows, including: medical imaging and diagnostics, remote patient monitoring, and risk prediction, among other tasks.

“By 2025, AI systems could be involved in everything from population health management, to digital avatars capable of answering specific patient queries,” added Buttar.

By 2025, AI systems could be involved in everything from population health management, to digital avatars capable of answering specific patient queries

Even with clear benefits and quickly evolving technology, hospitals staffed by robots in lab coats is far from a reality.

“Like any technological transition, the path toward a seamless digital-human partnership in healthcare is faced with many challenges,” says Gokul Solai, MD, technology firm Novatio Solutions’ co-founder. “But I think the end result will help so many people, it will be well worth us tackling those challenges.”

In this paper, we will explore the benefits of a future AI-supported healthcare system, as well as the questions we must answer to actualize that vision.

HOW AI IS CHANGING HEALTHCARE

Digital automation, machine learning, and artificial intelligence can play a key role in the revolution of healthcare. Novatio Solution’s Gokul Solai, MD, helps break down common solutions and key benefits they offer providers and patients.

10 COMMON AI SOLUTIONS (NOW AND FOR THE FUTURE)

MEDICAL RECORDS and OTHER DATA

Since the first step in health care is compiling and analyzing information (like medical records and other past history), data management is the most widely used application of artificial intelligence and digital automation. Robots collect, store, reformat, and trace data to provide faster, more consistent access.

“Insights gained from faster analysis of more data also helps patient education,” explains Solai. “We can say ‘This is what happened, and this is how you can help yourself with treatments and preventative measures.’”

TREATMENT and DESIGN

Artificial intelligence systems have been created to analyze data – notes and reports from a patient’s file, external research, and clinical expertise – to help select the correct, individually customized treatment path.

AI can help us simulate scenarios to compare treatment options,” says Solai. “For example, we can analyze the results of surgery for a patient’s heart blockage versus different medications, to custom tailor treatment plans.”

REPETITIVE JOBS

“While it may not be the most glamorous, the shifting claims processing, billing, and other back-end tasks away from people will have the biggest, most important, and most immediate impact,” says Solai.

“Why? Because AI technology will enable nurses and doctors to spend more time with patients,” he adds.

In addition, it allows doctors to give specialized attention to sicker people. Analyzing tests, X-rays, CT scans, data entry, and other mundane tasks can all be done faster and more accurately by robots. For example, cardiology and radiology are two disciplines where the amount of data to analyze can be overwhelming and time consuming. Cardiologists and radiologists in the future should only look at the most complicated cases where human supervision is useful.

DRUG CREATION

Developing pharmaceuticals through clinical trials can take more than a decade and cost billions of dollars. Making this process faster and cheaper could change the world.

Amidst the recent Ebola virus scare, a program powered by AI was used to scan existing medicines that could be redesigned to fight the disease. The program found two medications that may reduce Ebola infectivity in one day, when analysis of this type generally takes months or years – a difference that could mean saving thousands of lives.

MEDICATION MANAGEMENT

“One of the biggest reasons for patient readmittance is medication non-compliance or wrong medication or dosage was prescribed,” explains Solai. “There is tech now we can use to proactively monitor patients — if they taking their meds or experiencing side effects — without having to travel or physically visit them.”

The National Institutes of Health have created the AiCure app to monitor the use of medication by patients in this way. A smartphone’s webcam is partnered with AI to autonomously confirm that patients are taking their prescriptions and helps them manage their conditions. Most common users could be people with serious ailments, patients who tend to go against doctor advice, and participants in clinical trials.

VIRTUAL NURSES

The startup Sense.ly has developed Molly, a digital nurse to help people monitor patient’s condition and follow up with treatments, between doctor visits. The program uses machine learning to support patients, specializing in chronic illnesses.

In 2016, Boston Children’s Hospital developed an app for Amazon Alexa that gives basic health information and advice for parents of ill children. The app answers asked questions about medications and whether symptoms require a doctor visit.

HEALTHCARE SYSTEM ANALYSIS

In the Netherlands, 97% of healthcare invoices are digital. A Dutch company uses AI to sift through the data to highlight mistakes in treatments, workflow inefficiencies, and helps area healthcare systems avoid unnecessary patient hospitalizations.4

“AI can also help identify abuse of benefits and duplication of patient therapy,” adds Solai. “Things that usually fall through the cracks now, would get caught with the help of machine-aided data analysis.”

(For additional examples of AI applications, see Figure 2)

HEALTH MONITORING

Wearable health trackers – like those from FitBit, Apple, Garmin and others – monitors heart rate and activity levels. They can send alerts to the user to get more exercise and can share this information with doctors (and AI systems) for additional data points on the needs and habits of patients.

PRECISION MEDICINE

Genetics and genomics look for mutations and links to disease from the information in DNA. With the help of AI, body scans can spot cancer and vascular diseases early and predict the health issues people might face based on their genetics.

DIGITAL CONSULTATION

Apps like Babylon in the UK use AI to give medical consultation based on personal medical history and common medical knowledge. Users report their symptoms into the app, which uses speech recognition to compare against a database of illnesses. Babylon then offers a recommended action, taking into account the user’s medical history.

Care Management: applications for robotics

Care management presents plans with challenges typical to data overload: clinicians and others must aggregate information from multiple source

BENEFITS OF AI AND DIGITAL AUTOMATION IN HEALTHCARE

Cost Savings (Patients)

Diabetes is near epidemic levels in the U.S. (in 2014 an estimated 9% of the population had the disease), and it is spreading throughout the world. Those who suffer from the disease spend $5,000 to $10,000 a year just on medication. Diabetics who have complications can spend in the hundreds of thousands of dollars on care.5 Combined with lost wages, Diabetes cost the U.S. more than $245 billion a year.Digital solutions could be instrumental in battling this costly disease.

Virta, a smartphone app uses AI and machine learning to help diabetics manage their symptoms. Users regularly enter glucose levels, weight, blood pressure, activity, energy levels, hunger, and mood. The app monitors and looks for warning signs in all this patient data, with help from offline doctors and pattern recognition.

“Any clinical decision is always made by a doctor,” Virta Health co-founder Sami Inkinen said. “But the software increases productivity by 10-X.” Combined with proper diet other medical controls, around 87% of patients reduced or eliminated the use of their costly medications, in clinical trials. Imagine the cost savings if this method is replicated at scale and for other diseases.

Cost Savings (Providers)

Healthcare administration processing consumes a significant amount of time, effort, and manpower across markets worldwide. With a centralized, enterprise-wide, rule-based process oriented system already established, Robotic Process Automation can drive down operational costs and lower fraud and litigation risk by up to 50%. (See Figure 3.)

 

Source: HfS Research

“Not only does RPA remove system inefficiencies, it also lowers costs by reducing repeat patient procedures,” explains Solai.

Speed, Accuracy, and Productivity Increases

Digital health assistants can cover a large part of the clinical process – checking vital signs, answering basic questions, and providing prescriptions, all in less time than their human counterparts. With the help of AI and algorithms, workflow inefficiencies can be pinpointed and addressed. Human staffing can be adjusted constantly to meet patient needs.

Novatio Solutions predicts a 100% productivity increase over human workers in some areas of healthcare, especially operational tasks.

Medical diagnosis will benefit from increased speed and accuracy with the help of AI solutions. Overall, AI has the potential to improve outcomes by 30-40%.

At Purdue University Indianapolis, machine learning correctly predicted relapse rates for patients with leukemia with 90% accuracy. And identified those who would experience remission with 100% accuracy.

Shift From Mundane

Leveraging the strengths of robots (like repetitive tasks) frees up humans to play to their own strengths (like complex, nuanced problem solving and personal care).

“Doctors are spending time on things that really are incredibly redundant, and if a machine can do it, let them do it,” said Zen Chu, faculty director of Massachusetts Institute of Technology. “If there’s an easier way to enter all that data, do it so doctors can spend more time with that
patient.”

Boosting the humanistic element in healthcare is the change the healthcare needs

More one-on-one time with patients allows human clinicians to better care for patients’ mental and emotional needs – an area where robots are ill equipped.

“Boosting the humanistic element in healthcare is the change the healthcare needs,” says Solai. “While AI can’t do that directly, it frees us up to do it.”

Deeper Data Analysis

The University of Adelaide in Australia has been working on an AI system to predict the death of patients within five years based on CT scans.10 Trained to analyze over 16,000 signs of disease and partnered with deep learning algorithms, the AI system predicts with 69% accuracy (similar rates to human diagnosticians). With more data points and learning, the robots could be trained to measure overall health rather than a single disease.

Broader Access to Healthcare

The combination of data availability and AI will give future healthcare access to those who may not previously had access – either because of proximity or affordability.

Small clinics will be able to pull the same medical records and log into the same disease treatment databases of large hospitals. Symptoms and wearable tracking data will be uploaded to virtual nurses and AI systems that will recommend treatment. Apps and AI will support mobile nurse practitioners to give them the same recourses as brick-and-mortar facilities.

“Even in the U.S. in rural, remote areas, they don’t have access to high-quality healthcare,” says Solai. “Basic diagnosis and early intervention can be made remotely, or expedite transfer to a facility where they can get help.”

CHALLENGES FACING AI IN HEALTHCARE

The biggest obstacle for technology adoption in healthcare has and will be the nature of the industry itself. Tech startups and solution companies face an uphill battle convincing providers to change their processes and rely more on automation and artificial intelligence. Much of this battle is the mindset of the industry: risk aversion is understandable when human lives are at stake.

David Torchiana, CEO of Partners HealthCare explains, “[Healthcare] generally has a problem in being incredibly labor-intensive and having shown relatively less gains in productivity than the rest of the economy.”

“Healthcare as a system advocates ‘do no harm’ first and foremost. Not ‘do good’, but ‘do no harm,’” cautions Kapila Ratnam, Ph.D., a scientist turned partner at NewSpring Capital. “Every application of A.I. in healthcare is regulated by that fundamental philosophy.”

Additionally, Lisa Suennen, Managing Director at GE Ventures highlights that “the single biggest contribution to excess cost and error in healthcare is inertia.” The attitude of “this is how it’s always been done” is figuratively killing people, she says.

“There will be some pushback from insurance companies because they thrive on inefficiencies,” adds Solai. “Not everyone is excited about fixing those inefficiencies.”

Keeping this paradigm in mind, big answers and issues need to be tackled before more progress is made.

DATA SUPPORT INVESTMENT

Dr. Joseph Reger, CTO, Fujitsu EMEIA, recently stressed that machine learning and AI in healthcare will only be successful if data is the “lifeblood of the system.”

“Data will enable AI machines to learn and understand new medical functions, and then critically provide humans with the necessary information to diagnose problems,” Reger said.

“The potential application of AI in healthcare could even grow to possibly predict future illnesses even before they manifest, improving the quality of services for patients.” Reger adds. “All of this will not be achieved without vast swathes of data, an acceptance that AI will supplement jobs, not replace them, and the overall investmevnt in the technology itself.”

UNIVERSAL REGULATION OF PRIVATE INFORMATION

Although transparency of medical records and data between institutions would create massive benefits, it is weighed against the security of that data.

“In the wrong hands, access to all this private data could lead negative consequences,” warns Solai. “Insurance companies knowing about a patient’s preexisting condition and then rejecting them for coverage, for instance.”

It’s a challenge to dynamically regulate this space, but we should universally agree what we need to protect. Individual privacy security should be standardized throughout the world. Data is everywhere, it’s circulating everywhere, so it has to be regulated everywhere.

“We don’t want to prevent innovation, but we also have to recognize that we need to protect information. Especially personal information,” Solai says.

Data is everywhere, it’s circulating everywhere, so it has to be regulated everywhere

EARN TRUST, EMBRACE CHANGE

While many people are ready to trust AI-assisted healthcare providers, not everyone is there yet. Studies by Price Waterhouse Cooper found 55% of people are willing to use robots and AI to get health-related answers, tests, and diagnosis. However, 38% were not.

Convincing doctors, clinicians, nurses, and other stakeholders to place their trust in machines will also not be easy, said Steve Leonard, chief executive at innovation company SGInnovate.

“Healthcare is a very tricky area,” Leonard said. “Doctors and clinicians are not so excited sometimes about new models or new processes – and I don’t mean that disrespectfully. It’s just that’s a reality.”

However, momentum is moving toward a positive overall feeling toward what AI has to offer. According to one study, around 55% of healthcare organizations feel AI is important to competitiveness.

Success, said respondents, will be dependent on culture – getting managers and employees to trust the advice that robots offers. The hope is that this internal majority can help move the industry further toward mass adoption.

AVOID TECHNOLOGY OVER-RELIANCE

“Our society is heading toward embracing AI technology,” said Solai. “We want to make sure we don’t over-embrace this technology to the point of reliance.”

Having the ability for doctors to have recommendations written for them and treatment plans catered for them, could have a downside. It may make it too easy to just defer to machine-generated recommendations. Doctors could begin to relax, which is not the best mindset to be in when a patient’s best interest is at risk.

“When we had PDAs come in with predicted medication dosages, a lot of times we’d just defer to that,” explains Solai. “We weren’t necessarily asking ourselves for ‘How could this potentially be wrong?’”

“Taking away the human judgment element from medicine is definitely one thing we have to watch as technology evolves,” he says.

HUMAN TOUCH IS STILL NEEDED

Like other industries impacted by digital workforces, human workers will need to recognize more opportunities will come from the technology, not less. Robots in healthcare are not replacing but enhancing human efforts. Demonstrating this concept will be key.

A survey shows new jobs from healthcare AI will increase an estimated 13% by 2025. For these new jobs, respondents guessed companies would fill 58% with current staff and 42% with new hires.

Human staff will also need to understand that no algorithm is able to emulate both the social and professional functions of a doctor or nurse. Bedside manner will be even more important as the redundant, repetitive tasks of diagnosis and treatment are given to robots. Healthcare will lean even more heavily on humans for complex problem solving and personal care.

(See Figure 5, “A Day in the Life of an AI-Aided Doctor.”)

AI IS PART OF LARGER STRATEGY

While robotics offers the benefit of bolting onto existing processes, maximum efficiency gains are only possible when integrated with a wider transformation strategy.

Partnering RPA with strong leadership, data integration and analytics, and business process management is the true path to digital business innovation. (See Figure 6)

OTHER QUESTIONS THAT NEED ANSWERS

In addition to the previous key issues, the following unknowns will need addressed for continued AI adoption and to avoid possible pitfalls that come with it.

– What are the global ethical standards for healthcare AI? Who will develop and govern these standards?
– What are the possible downsides for mass AI adoption in healthcare?
– How will medical professionals gain basic knowledge on how AI works? Can they be convinced of its everyday benefits?
– Are patients ready to trust AI-supported diagnosis and treatment plans? What will it take to earn that trust?
– How will health-related data and privacy be protected if made more available for providers?
– How will healthcare institutions measure success and effectiveness?
– What are the liability implications of AI-supported diagnosis and treatment?

CHOOSING THE RIGHT PARTNER

When selecting the right digital workforce solution, you need a flexible, knowledgeable leader. Trust a partner who can give experience-based guidance on how to accommodate for a digital workforce implementation and transformational leadership to help the transition.

For 25 years, Novatio Solutions has provided this leadership in managed business process (BPO) outsourcing for Fortune 100 clients. They have returned more than 500,000 hours back to their partners, so that those organizations’ employees can focus on higher-value work. They have helped free managers from micromanaging. And they have helped empower people to to harness the cognitive skills that make them human.

The Novatio team understands automation and what it takes to transform business operations

“The Novatio team understands automation and what it takes to transform business operations,” says Gokul N. Solai, head of products and alliances for Novatio. “Our goal is to use digital workforce solutions to make everyone’s life easier, from the CEO to the person answering the phones.”

Medical Experience

Because of the medical background of co-founder, Solai, a certified MD, Novatio understands how technology and medicine intertwine to benefit each other.

Novatio has partnered with many of the U.S.’s major hospital systems to streamline their processes. And because there are commonalities in most large companies and healthcare groups, lessons and solutions can be delivered quickly. Solutions that are tested, optimized, proven, and ready to adapt to other providers.

Humanistic Mindset

When evaluating technology solutions in healthcare, the “what” and “why” — helping people live better, longer, more healthy lives — should be prioritized over the how.

“The most efficient solution might be what you want from technology,” says Solai, “But is it the safest most helpful solution?”

Their focus on the people impacted by the technology, instead of the technology separates Novatio from other firms.

More Than “Traditional” Automation

“Traditional” automation solutions usually fall short in their rigidity. They are limited in scope and benefits and too expensive to update or change. There’s a long change process that is highly disruptive to teams and systems. And, they require more internal technical resources.

In many cases, companies rely on legacy applications or systems that are no longer supported. When changes or integrations are needed, technical support resources are difficult to find. Novatio Solutions harmonizes multiple and previously disconnected robotic process automation (RPA) tools and combines them with next-generation technology to create a customized digital workforce. Robotic process automation with digital workers gives agility and flexibility to accommodate change; decreases time to value; and is less expensive to set up and maintain.

The Novatio online portal offers advanced business intelligence tools, an online marketplace and service catalog and visibility into usage and billing. Simulator tools provide real-time input on cost-savings, which prioritizes time and cost efficiency. The portal also provides insight into forecasting and demand prediction, which allow for to data driven staffing and a more proactive decision-making.

Novatio Digital Workforce

– Noninvasive, technology-agnostic workforce
– 100% compliance
– Zero errors
– 3-5 times greater productivity
– 1/10 price of traditional workforces
– 2-3 times faster implementation than other solutions

The Novatio Solutions Difference

1. We are experts on automation, technology and innovation.
2. We futureproof your digital workforce by keeping you ahead of the game.
3. We can streamline your practices in a fraction of time.
4. We provide solutions that are highly efficient, cost-effective, reliable and scalable.
5. We integrate across multiple platforms and industries.

We are able to combine our emerging technology with our industry-leading expertise to deliver an unrivaled experience to our customers

“Novatio allows your organization to accelerate the convergence of intelligence automation and artificial intelligence,” says Solai. “We are able to combine our emerging technology with our industry-leading expertise to deliver an unrivaled experience to our customers.”

CONCLUSION

CRAWLING COMES BEFORE RUNNING

As we look forward to a future of streamlined hospital systems, accelerated drug development, curated and personalized treatment plans, and universal healthcare access, perspective is needed. It will take time – for technology to improve and for people to trust the technology – before this future is a reality.

“Everyone wants to get to robust artificial intelligence tomorrow, but it’s an evolution,” explains Novatio’s Gokul Solai. “People and machines both learn through experiences. Babies evolve from sitting up to crawling to standing up to walking to running.”

The safest, most effective route is to start with simple solutions and work toward more advanced application of AI.

“When you’re implementing the first part of a strategy, you’re going to aim for continual improvement,” says Solai. “Technology is going to iteratively get better. Understanding that RPA is the first step and that it could be a long journey to AI is important.”

The long journey, as we have shown, could impact millions of lives.

1 “AI Heatmap: Healthcare Emerges As Hottest Area For Deals To Artificial Intelligence Startups,” CB Insights, June 18,2016. https://www.cbinsights.com/blog/artificial-intelligence-investment-heatmap/

2 Jennifer Bresnick, “How Do Artificial Intelligence, Machine Learning Differ in Healthcare?” Health IT Analytics https://healthitanalytics.com/features/how-do-artificial-intelligence-machine-learning-differ-in-healthcare

3 “From $600 M to $6 Billion, Artificial Intelligence Systems Poised for Dramatic Market Expansion in Healthcare,” Frost & Sullivan, January 5, 2016 https://ww2.frost.com/news/press-releases/600-m-6-billion-artificial-intelligence-systems-poised-dramatic-marketexpansion-healthcare

4 “Artificial Intelligence Will Redesign Healthcare,” The Medical Futurist http://medicalfuturist.com/artificial-intelligence-will-redesign-healthcare/

5 Kevin Maney, “How Artificial Intelligence Will Cure America’s Sick Health Care System,” Newsweek, May 24, 2017 http://www.newsweek.com/2017/06/02/ai-cure-america-sick-health-care-system-614583.html

6 “2014 National Diabetes Statistics Report,” Center for Disease Control and Prevention, https://www.cdc.gov/diabetes/data/statistics/2014statisticsreport.html

7 Ben Pallant, Abigail Dove, and Adam Brown, “Virta Health: Reversing Type 2 Diabetes with Low-Carb Diets & Coaching,” DiaTribe, March 10, 2017 https://diatribe.org/virta-health-launches-to-reverse-type-2-diabetes-with-low-carb-diets-coaching

8 Dr. Jon Warner “10 Roles Artificial Intelligence Can Play in Healthcare,” RX4 Group http://rx4group.com/what-role-is-artificial-intelligence-likely-to-play-in-healthcare-in-the-future/

9 Jordan Graham, “What Infusing Artificial Intelligence With Health Care Could Mean,” Boston Herald, May 19, 2017 http://www.govtech.com/health/What-Infusing-Artificial-Intelligence-With-Health-Care-Could-Mean.html

10 “The Future of Radiology and AI,” The Medical Futurist http://medicalfuturist.com/the-future-of-radiology-and-ai/

11 Mariya Yao, “The Opportunities & Challenges of AI in Healthcare,” TopBots, February 10, 2017 https://www.topbots.com/healthcare-ai-opportunities-challenges-policy-workflow/

12 Jennifer Kite-Powell, “See How Artificial Intelligence Can Improve Medical Diagnosis And Healthcare,” Forbes Magazine, May 16, 2017 https://www.forbes.com/sites/jenniferhicks/2017/05/16/see-how-artificial-intelligence-can-improve-medical-diagno-sis-and-healthcare/

13 Saheli Roy Choudhury, “A.I. can be a game-changer for health care but convincing doctors, clinicians can be ‘tricky,’” CNBC, May 5, 2017 http://www.cnbc.com/2017/05/05/artificial-intelligence-can-transform-healthcare.html

14 Bill Siwicki, “86% of healthcare companies use some form of AI,” Healthcare IT News, May 19, 2017 http://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/86-healthcare-companies-use-some-form-ai

SUMMARY

Process and task automation is an emerging technology that will change the way we work in the future (and already has). The challenge is how to implement that technology and gain buy-in and cooperation of human workers.

Collaboration between digital and human workforces offers higher productivity potential than each separately. Organization and business leaders have the responsibility to bridge the gap between the two to realize this potential.

To face this challenge, leaders must …

UNDERSTAND THE MARKETPLACE LANDSCAPE

By 2020, 60% of the top global companies will have doubled their productivity by shifting processes from humans to automation. Some jobs, up to 47% in the US, will be replaced but many others will be redefined or augmented by automation technology.

EMBRACE CHANGE AS INEVITABLE AND NECESSARY

Change and disruption, in every industry, is inevitable. Those who embrace, take advantage of and shift with those changes will be more successful than those who resist them.

HAVE A STRATEGIC PEOPLE-MANAGEMENT PLAN

To effectively navigate the incorporation of digital workforces, leaders will need to carefully and diligently manage their people’s responses. This means defining tangible actions to increase visibility and openness, remaining patient and humble and creating a clear worker retraining plan.

KNOW AND COMMUNICATE PERSONAL BENEFITS TO EMPLOYEES
The benefits of digital workforces are immediate and easy to understand … for the organization. Workers may find it hard to see the personal benefit for them, causing hesitancy to buy-in. Help them understand the advantages they gain from automation:

– A renewed emphasis on the “human element”
– New job opportunities
– Increased depth and scope of current roles
– Better quality of life and job satisfaction

CHOOSE THE RIGHT PARTNER

When selecting the right digital workforce products, you need a flexible, experienced and knowledgeable leader. Novatio Solutions has the expertise to lead a digital workforce implementation and transformational leadership to help the transition. Their unique solutions give more flexibility, cost savings and overall value to their partners.

TABLE OF CONTENTS
INTRODUCTION
SOLUTIONS
1. UNDERSTAND THE MARKETPLACE LANDSCAPE
2. EMBRACE THE COMING CHANGES
3. HAVE A STRATEGIC PEOPLE-MANAGEMENT PLAN
4. KNOW AND COMMUNICATE PERSONAL EMPLOYEE BENEFITS
5. CHOOSE THE RIGHT PARTNER
CONCLUSION
SOURCES & ADDITIONAL RESOURCES
ABOUT NOVATIO SOLUTIONS

INTRODUCTION: THE EMERGING DIGITAL WORKFORCE

Robotic process automation is a popular, yet divisive topic, especially in the context of business workplaces. As companies start conversations about integrating digital workforces, its human workers could see process automation from emerging technology (“robots”) as designed to replace them.

However, if workers and organization leaders embrace collaboration between humans and their digital workforce counterparts, the potential could take us further together than we ever could individually. The potential for automation plus people has now outpaced that of just people.

As Microsoft’s Dr. Hsiao-Wuen Hon claims, computers are “the best-ever left brain” (logic and rationality) and humans have “the best-ever right brain” (creativity, judgment, wisdom). Together, they form the “ideal kind of intelligence,” what some have called collective, amplified, “super intelligence.”

Partnered together effectively, digital workforces can empower human workers to focus on creativity and innovation and less on manual administrative tasks and mundane analysis. Companies benefit from the freedom of their human workers, in addition to the savings of cost and time.

The challenge is navigating the human emotions that arise as a result of change, especially one as possibly threatening as this specific change. And yet, it may be less of an uphill battle than we might think.

Research shows more than half of employees are open to digital progress. When faced with disruptors like digital workforces, 57% of workers say they will actually improve their job prospects.

With that in mind, this white paper lays out key truths, strategies and tactics leaders can lean on to gain the human buy-in needed for digital workforce integration.

1. UNDERSTAND THE CHANGING MARKETPLACE

WHY COMPANIES ARE INCORPORATING DIGITAL WORKFORCES

Digital Workforces shift human tasks to digital platforms through algorithms, machine learning and automation. They use software to automate a range of business processes, like redundant back office tasks, repetitive transaction processing and time-consuming reporting.

The benefits of digital workforces include:

Companies, in increasing numbers, are seeing these benefits and assessing how to leverage automation in their organizations. According to one study, by 2020, 60% of the G2000 will have doubled their productivity by shifting processes from humans to software-based delivery.

Another study estimates automation could raise productivity growth globally by 0.8 to 1.4 percent annually.

HOW DIGITAL WORKFORCES IMPACT THE HUMAN WORKFORCE

Over time, robots will take on challenging, time-consuming or labor-intensive tasks and perform them faster, cheaper and more efficiently. Some jobs will be replaced but many others will be redefined or augmented by automation technology.

A study by Oxford University and Deloitte researchers found that, over the next 20 years, around 47% of jobs in the United States and 35% of jobs in the United Kingdom are at high risk of being automated. The World Economic Forum estimates, by 2020, 5.1 million jobs will have been replaced globally by automation.

INDUSTRIES AND JOBS IMPACTED

Some job categories are more at risk than others. Jobs in office and administration, manufacturing, and construction are most at risk of being impacted by automation.

Roles that require human-to-human contact (health care), negotiation, social intelligence, or idea generation are more likely to remain in demand.

2. EMBRACE THE COMING CHANGES

Change and disruption, in every industry, is inevitable. New technology creates solutions to common problems. New problems arise to replace the old ones. And the cycle continues.

According to research by McKinney & Company, up to 60% of all occupations have at least 30% of activities that could be automated. Even though only 5% of current occupations have the potential to be replaced by automation, most will evolve because of its influence.

One estimate claims 65% of children entering elementary school today will end up working jobs that don’t yet exist.
Yet you could say something similar 20 years ago.

There will be a … repositioning of people into jobs that we don’t even have today that we will have in the future

says Garry G. Mathiason, a specialist in robotics employment law issues. “If you look back in history, you’ll see that this disruption has been going on for some time.”

Agriculture, he points out, employed 70%- 80% of the population in 1870, but today that number is less than 1%.

In the automotive industry, process automation on assembly lines have shifted human workers to other tasks. The benefit, as we’ll explore later, is that automation has allowed human workers to devote more mental capacity to areas with more value. Cars are safer now than they ever have been, thanks to the innovations made by humans free to explore.

In 2000, we could not have foreseen how online shopping, ride sharing, streaming video, and social media would impact retail, transportation, network and cable television, and the news media. And yet, workers have adapted. The unemployment rate in 2016 (4.6%) is largely consistent, if not lower, than those before these modern disruptors.

There’s no evidence to suggest the emergence of AI and digital workforces will be anything other than net positive.

3. HAVE A STRATEGIC PEOPLE-MANAGEMENT PLAN

“As we continue to experience technological advances, corporate leaders face a dilemma between retaining skilled employees and enhancing the workplace with automation,” says Pam Marmon, corporate change management consultant at Point B.

“Leaders need a clear plan to share the vision, remove roadblocks and communicate what success will look like for their company in the future,” she explains. To equip teams for the digital workforce transformation, Marmon stresses the following key components for strategic people management plan:

BE VISIBLE.

“Transformational initiatives fail when leaders fail to be visible throughout the entire change process,” says Marmon. “They need to consistently communicate and empower their teams to embrace the change.”

BE PATIENT.

Change is a process and most leaders experience the transformation prior to their teams even becoming aware of the shift in technology. While rumors might stall your progress, you can combat stagnation.

Communicate the reason for change, what’s in it for your employees [see Section 4], and how they can become informed of the progress associated with the transformational initiative.

BE OPEN.

As it is with any large transformation, leaders will encounter early adopters, laggards and everyone in between. Resistance is a normal part of the process and leaders should prepare for it.

“Organizational cultures that manage change effectively allow employees to express their concerns and questions without negative consequences,” says Marmon.

Three Tips to Encourage Openness

1. Create the space and the permission for employees to have a voice in how the change will impact them directly.
2. Engage in creative thinking that’s inclusive to increase collaboration.
3. Allow employees to participate in discussions, workshops, meetings, focus groups and other formal and informal communication efforts so you can understand and mitigate resistance.

BE HUMBLE (AND FLEXIBLE).

Your initial plan may evolve throughout the implementation of a digital workforce, and that too is normal. By being inclusive, you’ve learned what aspects of the transformation will work well in the culture of your organization.

You’ve received input from your team, and you’ve considered what’s at stake as it relates to your employees. Adjust your plans accordingly to reflect on the feedback and collaborative thought from your team.

The encouraging news? In a recent survey, workers who believe changes brought on by digital technology will improve their work experience outnumber the pessimists ten to one.

WORKER RETRAINING

When it comes to education and reskilling, employers will have to evaluate whether it is possible to retrain workers whose jobs will be replaced, to work along with digital workforces or in new roles.

Employees also have a responsibility to be involved in the retraining process. They need to stay informed, participate in the transformation activities, attend training designed to equip them for success and provide feedback throughout the transformational process.

“By developing their skillsets in areas where the company will excel, employees can transform themselves as a vital part of the future of the organization,” explains Marmon.

Businesses will need to prioritize talent development and future workforce strategy in order to grow. It’s not enough to just invest in digital workforces. Investment in people will also need bolstering.

4. KNOW AND COMMUNICATE PERSONAL BENEFITS TO EMPLOYEES

While benefits of using digital workforces may be clear for the company — time and money savings, efficiencies, reduced errors and 24×7 work capability — the advantages to employees may not be as immediately obvious. Communicating the unique benefits to each person will go a long way to getting buy-in.

RETAINED IMPORTANCE OF THE “HUMAN ELEMENT”

The digital workforce cannot replace the unique skills that humans possess. Tasks requiring complex problem solving, nuanced communication, empathy, interpretation and wise judgment, will still need a human touch.

The “human element” is still significant to consumers. Survey after survey shows that customers are more likely to be loyal to brands when they have positive face-to-face experiences. Apple, for example, is a brand with strong customer loyalty. Add in a personal interaction with an Apple team member, and repeat purchase rate is boosted an additional 60%.

Human service agents will rise in importance as intricate thinkers, trusted advisors and compassionate guides for their fellow humans. Employees with these natural talents will see their value boosted. Others can work to improve these skills and expand their career options.

The UK government uses facial-recognition AI to help protect its borders. At the introduction of this technology, some security guards approached the solution with hostility, feeling the system was taking away their jobs.

However, guards soon realized having AI do the mundane tasks of patrol freed them up to focus on the nuanced behavior of border entrants. Guards were also called in to resolve situations too complicated for robots, ultimately giving them an elevated status and higher self-value.

For executives and people-leaders, learning how to manage the subtleties of both human and digital workforces will be skills that stand out against their peers.

Apple is a brand with strong customer loyalty. But add in personal interaction with an Apple team member, and repeat purchase rate is boosted an additional 60%

NEW JOB OPPORTUNITIES

In a survey of businesses, almost three quarters say they will employ more people in the future. Some of these will be new roles, as digital workforces take over certain tasks. A 2014 report from the UK shows technology has likely created 3.5 million higher-skilled jobs, compared to the loss of 800,000 lower-skilled jobs.

One specific example of new job creation is the recent rise of crowdsourcing micro-tasks on platforms like Mechanical Turk. Mechanical Turk is a marketplace that employs groups of workers (called Turkers) to check the work of digital workforces, help them learn how to do the work better or do the work they can’t do. Sometimes described as “artificial artificial intelligence,” Turkers are usually highly educated and enjoy the flexibility of working whenever and wherever they want.

While this is only one example of new jobs being created by the adoption of digital workforces, many more are sure to emerge.

INCREASED DEPTH / SCOPE OF CURRENT JOBS

Automation means workers can take on higher value roles with increasingly specialized skills sets. This gives opportunities to become more of an expert in specific disciplines, making workers more indispensible to their organizations.

One example might be the field of journalism. Some estimate that machines could write 90% of news 15 years from now. But that doesn’t mean that 90% of journalist jobs would be replaced. Freed from writing everyday, facts-and-figures news articles, journalists could expand their coverage and dig deeper into complex stories.7

BETTER QUALITY OF LIFE AND JOB SATISFACTION

Higher wages, more challenging and rewarding tasks to perform and less idle time mean workers should enjoy their jobs more when collaborating with digital workforces.

For leaders, time that would previously have been spent micromanaging organizational and knowledge management processes can now be devoted to more valuable activities, such as innovation.

Of the new jobs created by technology in the UK, 3.5 million are jobs that require higher skills. Those new jobs have added an estimated £140 billion to the UK’s economy in new wages, paying £10,000 per year more than jobs lost, on average.

Employees in the U.S. currently work 25% more than their European counterparts (See Figure 1).12 Digital workforces can help buck that trend.

In one study, MIT estimates an 85% decrease in idle time when workers collaborate with robots.13 Less idle time means more productive time in the office, and less time at work overall. Shorter days, longer weekends, more vacation and leisure time could all be welcomed results.

These trends would fuel higher demand for workers in the service sector, like travel and hospitality, which now accounts for 81% of employment in the U.S. Those who lose jobs in manufacturing or construction will find opportunities in these thriving industries.

5. CHOOSE THE RIGHT PARTNER

When selecting the right digital workforce products, you need a flexible, knowledgeable leader. Trust a partner who can give experience-based guidance on how to accommodate for a digital workforce implementation and transformational leadership to help the transition.

For 25 years, Novatio Solutions has provided this leadership in managed business process (BPO) outsourcing for Fortune 100 clients. They have returned more than 500,000 hours back to their partners, so that those organizations’ employees can focus on higher-value work. They have helped free managers from micromanaging. They have helped empower people to to harness the cognitive skills that make them human.

“The Novatio team understands automation and what it takes to transform business operations,” says Gokul N. Solai, head of products and alliances for Novatio. “Our goal is to use digital workforce solutions to make everyone’s life easier, from the CEO to the person answering the phones.”

Novatio Solutions provides a versatility of implementations for a wide variety of companies in fields such as tech, finance, government, transportation, insurance, healthcare, retail and manufacturing.

“Imagine a workforce that is cost-effective, reliable, flexible, instantly scalable, consistent, 100 percent accurate and operates 24x7x365,” adds Solai.

“Now imagine empowering your best employees to dedicate their time to their most important responsibilities. This is the power behind Novatio Digital Workforce.”

MORE THAN “TRADITIONAL” AUTOMATION

“Traditional” automation solutions usually fall short in their rigidity. They are limited in scope and benefits and too expensive to update or change. There’s a long change process that is highly disruptive to teams and systems. And, they require more internal technical resources.

In many cases, companies rely on legacy applications or systems that are no longer supported. When changes or integrations are needed, technical support resources are difficult to find.

Novatio Solutions harmonizes multiple and previously disconnected robotic process automation (RPA) tools and combines them with next-generation technology to create a customized digital workforce. Robotic process automation with digital workers gives agility and flexibility to accommodate change; decreases time to value; and is less expensive to set up and maintain.

The Novatio online portal offers advanced business intelligence tools, an online marketplace and service catalog and visibility into usage and billing. Simulator tools provide real-time input on cost-savings, which prioritizes time and cost efficiency. The portal also provides insight into forecasting and demand prediction, which allow for to data-driven staffing and a more proactive decision-making.

NOVATIO DIGITAL WORKFORCE

– Noninvasive, technology-agnostic workforce
– 100% compliance
– Zero errors
– 3-5 times greater productivity
– 1/10 price of traditional workforces
– 2-3 times faster implementation than other solutions

THE NOVATIO SOLUTIONS DIFFERENCE

 

Novatio allows your organization to accelerate the convergence of intelligence automation and artificial intelligence,” says Solai. “We are able to combine our emerging technology with our industry-leading expertise to deliver an unrivaled experience to our customers.

FIGURE 1.


“ Hours Worked Europe and the U.S., New Data, New Answers,” by Alexander Bick, Bettina
Bruggemann, and Nicola Fuchs-Schundeln, 2016

*Overall hours per person, not just for people with jobs, incorporating time at work along
with reirement, vacation, unemployment, and other time spent out of the workforce.

CONCLUSION

Companies that thrive in the digital age will be those that identify opportunities for automation and embrace the technology it takes to get there. To do so, business models, products, services and the mindsets of human leaders and employees will have to adapt to the new future.

History tells us that the oncoming rise of machine learning, artificial intelligence and digital workforces is nothing to fear.

However, in order to overcome this human emotion, leaders will need to:

  • Understand the changing marketplace
  • Embrace the coming changes
  • Have a strategic people-management plan
  • Know and communicate personal benefits to employees
  • Choose the right partners

By harnessing the power of digital workforces, like those provided by Novatio Solutions, companies can get ahead of their competitors and offer better lives to their employees and customers.

SOURCES AND ADDITIONAL RESOURCES
1 Epi Ludvik Nekaj, “Artificial intelligence (AI) + Human intelligence (HI) = (collective) intelligence (amplified) or super intelligence,” Linkedin.com, Feb. 23, 2017 https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/artificial intelligence-ai-human-hi-collective-super-nekaj-%E5%AE%87-%E8%B5%AB

2 Jenny Roper, “Digital Skills: Disconnect Between Leaders and Employees,” HR Magazine, May 14, 2015http://www.hrmagazine.co.uk/article-details/digital-skills-disconnect-between-leaders-and-employees

3 Michael Rander, “Rise of the Digital Workforce,” Digital Magazine, May 9, 2016 http://www.digitalistmag.com/executive-research/live-business-the-rise-of-the-digital-workforce

4 “A Future that Works: Automation, Employment, and Productivity,” McKinsey & Company, Jan. 2017 http://www.mckinsey.com/~/media/mckinsey/global%20themes/digital%20disruption/harnessing%20automation %20for%20a%20future%20that%20works/a-future-that-works-executive-summary-mgi-january 2017.ashx

5 Carl Benedikt Frey and Michael A. Osborne, “The Future of Employment: How Susceptible are Jobs to Computerisation?” Oxford University, Sept. 17, 2013 http://www.oxfordmartin.ox.ac.uk/downloads/academic/The_Future_of_Employment.pdf

6 “The Future of Jobs: Employment, Skills and the Workforce Strategy for the Fourth Industrial Revolution,” World Economic Forum, Jan. 2016 http://www3.weforum.org/docs/WEF_Future_of_Jobs.pdf

7 Jane Wakefield, “Intelligent Machines: The jobs robots will steal first,” BBC News, Sept. 14, 2015, http://www.bbc.com/news/technology-33327659

8 Vivian Giang, “Robots Might Take Your Job, But Here’s Why You Shouldn’t Worry,” Fast Company, July 28, 2015 https://www.fastcompany.com/3049079/robots-might-take-your-job-but-heres-why-you-shouldnt worry

9 John Cassidy, “Man vs. Machine: Three Myths About the Digital Workforce” – CIO.com, Feb. 11, 2016https://www.cio.com.au/article/593796/man-versus-machine-three-myths-about-digital-workforce/

10 “Nearly 60 Percent of Apple Owners More Likely to Purchase Another Apple Device After Positive Tech Service, According to NPD,” NPD, Aug. 28, 2012 https://www.npd.com/wps/portal/npd/us/news/press releases/pr_120828/

11 “From Brawns to Brains: The Impact of Technology on the Jobs in the UK” – Deloitte, 2015 https://www2.deloitte.com/content/dam/Deloitte/uk/Documents/Growth/deloitte-uk-insights-from-brawns-to-brai n.pdf

12 Ben Staverman, “Americans Work 25% More Than Europeans, Study Finds,” Bloomberg, Oct. 18, 2016 https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2016-10-18/americans-work-25-more-than-europeans-study-finds

13 Martin Feldstein, “Why US workers shouldn’t fear a robot taking their job,” World Economic Forum, Sept. 29, 2016 https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2016/09/why-us-workers-shouldnt-fear-a-robot-taking-their-job

SUMMARY

We leverage our methodology to the benefit of our clients,” says Novatio Solutions CEO, Gokul Solai. “It’s the main thing we’ve learned in over 25 years of exposure to different industries.”

Whereas other firms approach Robotic Process Automation solutions with a vertical or industry mindset (finance solutions for financial institutions), Novatio thinks differently. Over the years, Novatio has developed a suite of process-first solutions that are applicable to any industry. By using this method, they have been able to bring tested, trusted solutions to their clients.

SOME OF THE STANDARDIZED PROCESS-FIRST SOLUTIONS INCLUDE
  • Basic service processes
  • Resource management
  • End-user services
  • Support center automation
  • Data management and migration
  • Supply chain management
  • Infrastructure automation

“We leverage our methodology to the benefit of our clients”

How Clients Benefit

Aside from their wealth of knowledge and experience, Novatio’s unique approach benefits their clients in four key ways.

TIME SAVINGSInstead of starting from scratch, they repurpose solutions to similar processes. They know how to create and implement solutions, because they’ve already done it
COST SAVINGSLess time in development means lower costs. And faster implementation means more time profiting from the value offered by RPA.
POLISHED SOLUTIONSEach time a solution is used, inefficiencies are refined. Clients get the benefit of lessons learned without the pain
FLEXIBLE FOR THE FUTURENovatio plans for 1-5 years from now, not just today. And their standardized solutions work with any system, meaning they can adapt to changing infrastructure

In this guide, we will dive deeper into the power of RPA and how Novatio’s process-first ethos makes them a go-to resource

INTRODUCTION: The Power Of RPA

Once termed “macro-based automation,” Robotic Process Automation (RPA) has advanced in recent years. Now more powerful, RPA allows companies to tie together processes, make decisions, and perform actions based on defined rules and criteria.

They also have been developed to adapt to different environments (something macros can’t do) and also be used as an enterprise-wide, modulated, and coordinated effort. That’s why Novatio refers to these teams of digital workers as a “workforce.”

With RPA, software “robots” replicate actions, like entering data into an enterprise platform or moving data from one system to another. Once the digital worker has been trained to grasp certain processes, it can automatically manipulate information, communicate with other systems, and process transactions autonomously.

Artificial Intelligence (AI) technologies like RPA and machine learning are the biggest disruptors in global business since the Internet. They are transforming work by stripping away mundane, repetitive tasks and freeing up people to handle more advanced tasks. Since RPA solutions are less complex ones—they can work with existing IT systems and work processes—global industries see this as a way to dip their toes in AI.

THE BENEFITS OF DIGITAL WORKFORCE INCLUDE
  • Increased Efficiency, reliability, and compliance
  • Reduced Errors
  • Analytical Insight
  • 24×7 Work Capability
  • Flexibility and Scalability

According to one study, by 2020, 60% of the G2000 will have doubled their productivity by shifting process- es from humans to software-based delivery. Another study estimates automation could raise productivity growth globally by 0.8 to 1.4 percent annually.

And as the Baby Boomer population retires (at the rate of about 10,000 a day), many companies are seeing an opportunity to adopt automation technologies, just by shifting their tasks to digital workforces.

Partnered together effectively, digital workforces can empower human workers to focus on creativity and inno- vation and less on manual administrative tasks and mundane analysis. Companies benefit from the freedom of their human workers, in addition to the savings of cost and time.

Tech firms who develop RPA solutions tend to think vertically. When a retail client comes to them, they propose a solution unique to the industry and sometimes the customer. As we’ll see, Novatio approaches challenges with a process-first approach, using standardized solutions to common processes

THE NOVATIO DIFFERENCE: Standardized, Process-First Solutions

Gokul Solai, Novatio Solutions co-founder and CEO explains how they approach the creation of RPA solutions. And how this approach gives an edge to their clients

Q: HOW DOES NOVATIO’S WAY OF THINKING ABOUT SOLUTIONS DIFFER FROM OTHER FIRMS?

Solai: Our solutions are not just focused on customer needs today. We also predict what you need one to five years from now. Our tech is successful in that we can accommodate any changes in infrastructure. As a result, we can offer dynamic solutions that grow hand-in-hand with organizational needs.

Where as other firms try to be more prescriptive with their solutions, we work with organizations to understand their current processes and rules. We don’t want to rewrite the book. We prefer to combine a company’s best practices and our experience to deliver a synergistic solution.

“[We] predict what you need one to five years from now. … As a result, we can offer dynamic solutions that grow hand-in-hand with organizational needs.”

Q: HOW IS THINKING ABOUT SOLUTIONS IN A MORE PROCESS-ORIENTATED WAY AN ADVANTAGE? HOW DOES THINKING IN A VERTICAL WAY LIMIT POSIBILITIES?
Solai: There’s a buzzword in corporate culture—being “siloed”—that refers to the tendency for departments, sys- tems, or processes to be isolated and insulated. Thinking about solutions in a simply vertical way promotes silos.

If you are working in silos, your finance team will be performing processes a certain way, and your supply chain team could be accomplishing the same tasks in a different way. There will always be similar processes in those verticals and silos, like ticket management scenarios or password resets.

“It allows us to deliver soluctions in less time and at lower costs. Instead of developing from scratch, we can just rework [already proven] solutions.”

If you use a process-first approach, all those efficiencies are passed on throughout the organization. When you standardize the process, your people and your systems operate in unison. You can see how this would uncover efficiencies, time savings, and cost savings for your company.

When it comes to diagnosing and implementing solutions, a process-first approach allows us (Novatio) to repurpose our experience with other organizations. Every process-first solution we’ve implemented becomes a possible solution for the next company.

And, maybe the biggest thing here, it allows us to deliver solutions in less time and at lower costs. Instead of developing from scratch, we can just rework solutions we used for a finance firms to apply to the same processes used and proven effective by a retail company, for example.

Q: HOW DID YOU COME ABOUT THIS WAY OF THINKING?
Solai: My background is in medicine, and you would think processes are completely different to what is done in the corporate world. That mindset is also typical to insurance, consulting, and other fields.

When I got out of the classroom and started practicing, I found medicine was in many ways like an assembly line. The process for adding patients into our systems is similar for on-boarding and off-boarding employees or customers in other industries. There are many examples of overlapping processes and inefficiencies from one field to another … so, why can’t we take lessons learned from finance, for example, and carry them over to medicine?

Why limit this thinking to medicine? Why not find wins that translate from other industries, to other industries?

 

Q: WHAT EXAMPLES DO YOU HAVE WHERE THIS PARADIGM HELPED YOU PROVIDE BETTER, MORE COST-EFFECTIVE SOLUTIONS?
Solai: Going back to the assembly line of medicine: when a patient comes in to be seen by a doctor there’s a process for adding them to a provider’s systems. It’s not universal, but the patient usually fills out paperwork, insurance needs to be checked by a nurse or clerk … and so on.

In a corporate environment, similar onboarding processes are written out and used over and over. Rules are followed. We’ve been able to use these rules to create RPA solutions (and remove the human error that can come from all those manual steps). Those solutions have been translated to automatically process onboarding and claims so that human workers can be freed up. (See Figure 1.)

PATIENT ON-BOARDING (MEDICINE)CUSTOMER ON-BOARDING (RPA SOLUTION FROM OTHER INDUSTRIES)
Patient fills out informational paperworkCustomer fills out information digitally
Admin keys information into systemsDigital worker pulls information into different systems
Nurse or admin validates insurance and other submitted informationDigital worker validates and routes submitted information based on identified criteria

Q: WHAT IS SOME OF THE FEEDBACK YOU’VE RECEIVED FROM CLIENTS ABOUT YOUR METHODOLOGY?
Solai: A lot of companies have technology initiatives planned out for next year, but we help them develop a five- or 10-year plan based on what other companies do. This allows clients to be ahead of the curve, even five years down the line. We give companies visibility for where innovation is moving.

Q: CAN YOU LIST SOME OF THE STANDARD SOLUTIONS YOU HAVE DEVELOPED? HOW HAVE YOU USED THEM?
Solai: Basic service processes, like monitoring network operation centers for service questions or data. Follow up on any service tickets to make sure they are closed down, which is applicable to any queue. As mentioned before, processes for on-boarding and off-boarding employees, customers, and patients; password resets; other common IT requests.

Resource management: From the tech side, when a computer or server approaches maximum capacity, we have solutions to automate resource allocation or alert staff. Similarly, we have solutions to help with human resource management. When volume escalates and you need more workers, we can automatically trigger alerts to call or reallocate staff.

Data management and migration is another big area for automation. Every vertical has to process orders and invoices. We have many swivel seat solutions for moving and validating information

Supply chain management can be complicated, with multiple vendors, payment systems, and their logistics en- gines. Our solutions can apply to those systems for faster processing and cleaner data. Hospitals worry about delivery of crucial medical supplies, just as retailers and suppliers worry about product deliveries. We can leverage the learning from one and apply to the other.

Infrastructure management: Any organization has checks and balances make sure things don’t fall through the cracks (for example, service level requirements). Usually, it’s a person keeping tabs on things like that, with a run- ning list. We have standard solutions to automate that.

These are just a few.

Q: HOW HAVE YOU USED THE SAME STANDARD SOLUTION IN DIFFERENT CONTEXTS?
Insurance providers might have 15 different agents with 15 different ways they process claims. They might also out- source claim processing. All those people log into multiple systems and fill in information, which must be communi- cated back to the home office. It can take up to two weeks for all these tedious tasks just to process a claim.

We see this challenge across all industries. Companies use numerous systems and applications to do their everyday work—oftentimes more than one to accomplish a single task. We can apply our standardized solutions to automate data migration from one system to another and pare down the amount of time-consuming system logins.

Novatio uses our own proprietary methodology to reuse components we build because our solutions are geared toward fixing common problems. We think about problems with that mindset, and we build solutions with that mindset.

We leverage our methodology to the benefit of our clients. It’s the main thing we’ve learned in 25 years of exposure to different industries.

CHOOSING THE RIGHT PARTNER

When selecting the right digital workforce solution, you need a flexible, knowledgeable leader. Trust a partner who can give experience-based guidance on how to accommodate for a digital workforce implementation and transformational leadership to help the transition

Our goal is to use digital workforce solutions to make everyone’s life easier, from the CEO to the person answering the phones

For 25 years, Novatio Solutions has provided this leadership in managed business process (BPO) outsourcing for Fortune 100 clients. They have returned more than 500,000 hours back to their partners so that those organizations’ employees can focus on higher-value work. They have helped free managers from micromanaging. And they have helped empower people to harness the cognitive skills that make them human

“The Novatio team understands automation and what it takes to transform business operations,” says Solai. “Our goal is to use digital workforce solutions to make everyone’s life easier, from the CEO to the person answering the phones.”

More Than “Traditional” Automation

“Traditional” automation solutions usually fall short in their rigidity. They are limited in scope and benefits and too expensive to update or change. There’s a long change process that is highly disruptive to teams and systems. And, they require more internal technical resources.

In many cases, companies rely on legacy applications or systems that are no longer supported. When changes or integrations are needed, technical support resources are difficult to find.

Novatio Solutions harmonizes multiple and previously disconnected RPA tools and combines them with next-gen- eration technology to create a customized digital workforce. Robotic process automation with digital workers gives agility and flexibility to accommodate change; decreases time to value; and is less expensive to set up and maintain.

The Novatio online portal offers advanced business intelligence tools, an online marketplace and service catalog, and visibility into usage and billing. Simulator tools provide real-time input on cost-savings, which prioritizes time and cost efficiency. The portal also provides insight into forecasting and demand prediction, which allow for to da- ta-driven staffing and a more proactive decision-making

Novatio Digital Workforce

  • Noninvasive, technology-agnostic workforce
  • 100% compliance
  • Zero errors
  • 3-5 times greater productivity
  • 1/10 price of traditional workforces
  • 2-3 times faster implementation than other solutions

THE NOVATIO SOLUTIONS DIFFERENCE

– WE are experts on automation, technology and innovation
– WE futureproof your digital workforce by keeping you ahead of the game
– WE can streamline your practices in a fraction of time
– WE provide solutions that are highly efficient, cost-effective, reliable and scalable
– WE integrate across multiple platforms and industries

“Novatio allows your organization to accelerate the convergence of intelligence automation and artificial intelli- gence,” says Solai. “We are able to combine our emerging technology with our industry-leading expertise to deliv- er an unrivaled experience to our customers.”

We are able to combine our emerging technology with our industry-leading expertise to deliver an unrivaled experience to our customers

SOURCES AND ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

1 Michael Rander, “Rise of the Digital Workforce,” Digital Magazine, May 9, 2016
Novatio is a Digital Workforce solutions provider from the founders of Solai & Cameron
http://www.digitalistmag.com/executive-research/live-business-the-rise-of-the-digital-workforce
Technologies. The company capitalizes on Solai & Cameron’s 25 years of experience developing best practices in operational transformation.

2 “A Future that Works: Automation, Employment, and Productivity,” McKinsey & Company, Jan. 2017 http://www.mckinsey.com/~/media/mckinsey/global%20themes/digital%20disruption/harnessing%20automa-
Novatio harmonizes multiple robotic process automation (RPA) tools along with next generation
tion%20for%20a%20future%20that%20works/a-future-that-works-executive-summary-mgi-january-2017.ashx
technology to create a customized digital workforce. Consequently, Novatio’s clients benefit from added capacity, scalability and efficiency.